Atlanta Teen Voices / all

What’s Happening in Sudan Right Now: Three Explanations of the Crisis

by share

I’m sure a lot of us have seen everyone turning the profile picture to this solid blue color, or all headlines about Sudan in our explore page, and probably some video footage of the area on Instagram, or even in an article. But why? What’s going on in Sudan? Why is everyone so silent, and not acting as quick to open their pockets or speak up as they did for the empty building in France?

Personally, I don’t know, but let’s start from the beginning.

How did the conflict in Darfur, Sudan start?

The war in Darfur, Sudan is also known as the Land Cruiser War, is a crisis and conflict that started in February 2003, when different movements such as the ‘Sudan Liberation Movement’ and the ‘Justice and Equality Movement’ groups started speaking up and against the government.

These movements have accused the government of oppressing Darfur’s non- Arab people. With some of the civilians speaking up, this resulted in the government responding with a campaign of ethnic cleansing against Darfur’s non-Arab people. Still happening in the present day, this is resulting in the deaths of thousands of civilians and resulted in the indictment of Sudan’s president, named Omar al- Bashir, for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes by the International Criminal Court.

Why did everyone want the government to change and Omar al-Bashir out?

According to an article and study done by CNN, “Bashir’s legacy is one of human sufferings and atrocities.”. Since his placement as president the infractions include:

  • 15,000 villagers were killed by the Janjaweed government (2003 – 2004)
  • Chargers of genocide and war crimes [ which also took many more important lives ]
  • Brutality amongst peaceful protestors
  • Targeting of women negatively
  • Forced to only have one religion, even if you didn’t agree with it

 

READ  As a Teen of Color, Netflix's New Movie 'Tall Girl' Just Wasn't Relatable to Me

Bashir was arrested in April and no longer holds power so why protest?

Civilians of Sudan celebrated the displacement of Bashir, as they were not aware all the power was being given to the military and a democratic vote was not really taking place. Outrage is occurring, the military is causing harm to many civilians which have been quoted from persons who have talked to CNN recently.

Two others died after “having been beaten and stabbed” by Rapid Support Forces, according to the committee, though it is unclear on what day they sustained their injuries. “

“(They are) directly endangering the lives of the wounded and injured,” the association said in a statement. According to the Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors, eight hospitals have been “completely shut down” by the military. “

The military is killing, harming, and damaging the lives of young children, mothers, and families who simply want the rights of freedom and their voices to be heard. So listen and help Sudan as quick as we helped the empty building in France. Because their life matters too.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *